Posts for uncategorized category:

Rejuvenating Porsche 993 instrument faces

12 Aug 2013 by

Our sister company Philip Raby Porsche has a lovely Porsche 993 Targa in stock at the moment. It’s a great example but is marred by one annoying thing; it has silver-faced instrument dials and the the surface of these is bubbling slightly, which is unsightly.

 

At first, we thought that they were aftermarket faces – it’s a fairly common modification – but when we checked the car’s option codes we discovered that, in fact, the Porsche left the factory with silver dials.

 

This worried us as we thought that we’d need to source new faces but on taking the clock to pieces we discovered that the silver front was simply stuck over the standard black face. So it was a simple job to peel off the bubbling silver to reveal the standard black below. And we much prefer the black faces to the silver ones!

photo

Porsche Jacks

29 Jul 2013 by

993923_407123326073393_1023392211_n

At the Goodwood Festival of Speed, Porsche displayed three 911s high in the air, which made us think about jacking (no, not that…). So here’s our quick guide to Porsche jacks.

 

Most road-going Porsches have a jack stored in the luggage compartment. Typically this is a compact scissor-style device that fits into an aperture under the sill; it should never be used in any other position. The factory jack is fine for raising the car to remove a wheel, but should not be used on its own if you need to crawl under the car for any reason. Neither is it recommended if you have to remove two wheels on one side of the car.

 

The weights shown are for guidance only. They are typical for a car of the period, and will vary according to the exact age and model of the vehicle.

 

Porsche 356 1950-1966 (900kg)

The jack fits into an exposed point under each sill, in line with the trailing edge of the doors

 

Porsche 911 1963–73 (1100kg)

The jack fits into an exposed point under each sill, in line with the trailing edge of the doors

 

Porsche 912 1965-1969 (950kg)

The jack fits into an exposed point under each sill, in line with the trailing edge of the doors

 

Porsche 911 1974–89 (1200kg)

The jack fits into a point hidden behind a removable rubber plug in each sill, in line with the trailing edge of the doors.

 

Porsche 964/993 1989–97 (1300kg)

The jack locates on plates beneath the sills, at the front and the rear ends, just behind and in front of the wheelarches.

 

Porsche 996 1997–2004 (1400kg)

The jack locates into points beneath the sills, at the front and the rear ends, just behind and in front of the wheelarches.

 

Porsche 997 2004-2011 (1400kg)

The jack locates into points beneath the sills, at the front and the rear ends, just behind and in front of the wheelarches.

 

Porsche Boxster 1997- (1250kg)

The jack locates in points underneath the sills, at the front and the rear ends, just behind and in front of the wheelarches.

 

Porsche 924 and 924S 1977-1988 (1100kg)

The jack locates at points under the front or rear of each sill.

 

Porsche 944, 968 1983-1995 (1200kg)

The jack locates underneath the centre of each sill, at points marked by embossed arrows in the sills. The 944 S2 has extensions to allow the jack to clear the plastic sideskirts.

 

Porsche 928 1978-1995 (1500kg)

The jack locates up into points underneath the sills, at the front and the rear ends, just behind and in front of the wheelarches.

 

Porsche Cayenne 2003- (2200kg)

The jack locates up into points inboard of the sills, at the front and rear ends, just behind and in front of the wheelarches.