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Porsche IMS Bearing Upgrade

02 Feb 2016

Porsche IMS Bearing failure is a known issue with the 9×6 and 9×7 models from 1998-2008

IMS3

To prevent this failure, we at AW Motor Sport are happy to introduce this upgraded bearing that can be fitted without the extremes of a complete engine strip and rebuild at a very competitive price.

Please contact us for further information or to make a booking

Fully fitted prices from £1350 inc VAT

Porsche RMS (rear main seal) replacement

24 Sep 2013

The correct tool is essential for fitting a rear main seal. It pushes the seal slowly and surely into position
The correct tool is essential for fitting a rear main seal. It pushes the seal slowly and surely into position

Removing the old seal from the end of the engine, after the gearbox has been removed
Removing the old seal from the end of the engine, after the gearbox has been removed

A common job for us to replace a rear main seal (RMS to its friends) on Porsche 996, 997, Boxster and Cayman engines.

Porsche RMS issues are often discussed by Porsche owners and buyers, and it’s often blown out of all proportion. A Porsche RMS leak usually causes nothing more than a slight oil leak which, if you’re really unlucky, will reach as far as your garage floor.

The rear main seal is at the end of the engine where the crankshaft comes through to meet the clutch and gearbox. The seal is there to stop engine oil leaking through around the crankshaft. Problems with the RMS are common and most Porsche 996, 997, Boxster and Cayman engines will suffer an RMS leak at some point in their lives. It’s not unique to Porsche either – we see other marques with similar problems.

The rear main seal was redesigned by Porsche a number of times, which improved the reliability but it never really solved the problem fully.

IMG_7635

The seal itself is inexpensive but replacing it means removing the gearbox, which obviously is labour intensive. Therefore, with manual transmission Porsches, we usually suggest that you live with the leak until the gearbox has to come out for other work – which is invariably a clutch change. Indeed, it makes sense to check the seal carefully when the clutch is out and replace it if there’s the slightest doubt as to its condition.

The trick to a successful job is to ensure that the new seal is fitted correctly, which means straight and snuggly without damaging it. And the only way to do that is to use the correct Porsche tool which presses the seal into place properly.

If you need anything done to your Porsche, classic or modern, please get in touch.